Anime Boston excites

“Did you know Massachusetts has an Anime Society?” asked senior Nate Weinberg, who has been to Anime Boston five times. The three-day convention is held annually in the Hynes Convention Center and Sheraton Boston Hotel in Boston MA.

“When there, I am always struck by the sheer number and varieties of people there, of many genders, races, and fandoms,” he said.

‘Under the supervision of the New England Anime Society, over 22,000 people celebrate and promote Japanese animation and comics at the annual event.

Anime Boston also delves a little into Japanese history and pop-culture, allowing fans to enjoy some of the classical taste of anime, like “maid cafes.” Maid cafes are a subcategory of cosplay restaurants found in Japan. In these cafes, waitresses dressed in maid costumes act as servants and treat cutomers as masters and mistresses.

It wouldn’t be a proper convention without food, now would it? Pocky, ramen, sushi, you can find all of these and more at the concession stands scattered around. And coffee abounds.

Since it’s inaugural event in April, 2003 Anime Boston has been a cornerstone of the North East Anime Convention circuit. Weinberg prepared himself for the convention by making his own costume or cosplay outfit. Weinberg gathered the materials, printed designs he would need, and sewed the whole thing together himself.

“My favorite panel is called ‘bad anime bad,’ which is one man’s collection of the worst anime and comics he could find,” said Weinberg.

You can find just about any type of cartoon or graphic novel showing off at a booth during the convention, from stuffed animal creations to life-sized body-pillows. “One really memorable moment was when I got a gift certificate for telling a pun,” said Weinberg.

Anyone can also attend talks from people in the industry, or to just discuss their favorite shows and characters.

While the main focus on Anime Boston has always been Japanese animation and comics, they have expanded to include other aspects of fiction such as Marvel or DC comics. “I love walking into a huge group of people and shouting, “Marco!” Then all I hear is, “Is dead,” said Weinberg.

This is an example of one of the many jokes you’ll see at the convention. The joke is from the show Attack on Titan, in which a character named Marco dies. Instead of saying “Marco, Polo,” people say “Marco, is dead.”

People can rent out spaces for booths, setting up their collections, selling merchandise, self-portraits in anime, and many other activities.

When someone wants to get into the anime experience, they’ll often dress up as their favorite character, called cosplay.

For people who don’t have the time or motivation to make a costume or dress up for the convention, there are plenty of booths that sell colored wigs, homemade costumes, makeup help, even some that sell props like swords, guns, and gunswords.

Whether it’s roleplaying as your favorite character, hanging out with your fellow fans, holding yourself back from buying all the cool toys, or just walking around enjoying the sights, Anime Boston has something for anyone.

You can find just about any type of cartoon or graphic novel showing off at a booth during the convention, from stuffed animal creations to life-sized body-pillows. “One really memorable moment was when I got a gift certificate for telling a pun,” said Weinberg.

Anyone can also attend talks from people in the industry, or to just discuss their favorite shows and characters.

While the main focus on Anime Boston has always been Japanese animation and comics, they have expanded to include other aspects of fiction such as Marvel or DC comics. “I love walking into a huge group of people and shouting, “Marco!” Then all I hear is, “Is dead,” said Weinberg.

This is an example of one of the many jokes you’ll see at the convention. The joke is from the show Attack on Titan, in which a character named Marco dies. Instead of saying “Marco, Polo,” people say “Marco, is dead.”

People can rent out spaces for booths, setting up their collections, selling merchandise, self-portraits in anime, and many other activities.

When someone wants to get into the anime experience, they’ll often dress up as their favorite character, called cosplay.

For people who don’t have the time or motivation to make a costume or dress up for the convention, there are plenty of booths that sell colored wigs, homemade costumes, makeup help, even some that sell props like swords, guns, and gunswords.

Whether it’s roleplaying as your favorite character, hanging out with your fellow fans, holding yourself back from buying all the cool toys, or just walking around enjoying the sights, Anime Boston has something for anyone.